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Army Of Two The 40th Day


Army of Two: The 40th Day is a third-person shooter video game developed by EA Montreal and published by Electronic Arts for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. The game was also released for PlayStation Portable, which was developed by Buzz Monkey.[4] It is the sequel to Army of Two. Army of Two: The 40th Day was released in January 2010 worldwide.




Army of Two The 40th Day


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The 40th Day focuses on two-player cooperative play and employs a cover system. It features Tyson Rios and Elliot Salem, the two protagonists from the original game, as combatant partners who, with the assistance of their handler Alice Murray, must fight to survive and prevail over invading forces that have engulfed Shanghai, China in a devastating terrorist attack.


The 40th Day expands on and refines the cooperative play featured in the original game. Players can use co-op moves at any time.[8] The playbook allows players to scan enemies prior to engaging them in order to set up particular team-based tactics.[9] For example, players can mock surrender or set up simultaneous sniper shots. This is in addition to using aggro as a mechanic for tactically engaging enemies in the midst of combat.


Aggro is a system that allows two players to tactically control the target of their enemy's attacks and possibly change the outcome of a firefight. Aggro is measured by a HUD element that displays which player the enemy characters are currently focusing on. By performing aggressive actions, such as firing one's weapon at enemies, a player generates aggro and in turn causes enemies to focus more of their attention on that player, and less attention on the player with less aggro. While one player has aggro, the other is usually being ignored and as a result, can then freely perform actions such as flanking or sniping.[10] In The 40th Day, additional non-aggressive actions can affect aggro. For example, by performing a mock surrender the enemy combatants will focus all of their attention on the player that is surrendering, allowing the other to perform a surprise attack. Some non-aggressive acts can be performed cooperatively as well.


In The 40th Day players are forced to make moral decisions that affect the story of the game. At pre-determined points in the game, players will be presented with a choice. For example, whether they should steal weapons from a mall security armory or vacate the premises.[11] The decision is not a vote between two players, but instead either player must decide while the other player is forced to accept the ramifications of that decisions regardless of what their preference was.[12] The outcome and presentation of these morality moments takes the form of comic panels created by the popular artists Chris Bachalo, Jamie Mendoza and Jock.[13]


The 40th Day maintains its focus on cooperative gameplay by requiring that players play in a partnership. Partners are a source for ammunition and are able to revive their fallen teammate. There are four multiplayer game modes:[14]


Handler Alice Murray radios in and tells them they will get extra cash for terminating JB; Rios and Salem can either choose to kill him or lie to Alice about his escape. Following JB's fate, Shanghai comes under attack by terrorists, ravaging the city. Rios and Salem barely escape the building and encounter the 40th Day Initiative mercenaries attempting to kill them. They manage to contact Alice, who informs them that she is alive but trapped in the South African Consulate. They head for the consulate, dispatching groups of mercenaries well as encountering civilian hostages, whom they either rescue or leave behind. Inside the consulate, Rios and Salem discover Alice being held hostage in an office. After freeing her, the three fight their way to the main hall, where a crashed helicopter allows them to escape into the underground tunnels.


As Rios and Salem bunker down to rest, they realize that they will not be able to escape and instead decide to exact revenge on the 40th Day Initiative by killing their leader, Jonah Wade. They manage to track him to a heavily fortified temple, and the pair fight through it until they reach the inner sanctum, finally meeting Jonah. Jonah then justifies his actions as a violent social experiment to force the world to turn back from the moral decay that is destroying it while holding a device that he claims is the trigger for a nuclear bomb located deep in the city.


A community-oriented weapons design contest was run for The 40th Day. The contest challenged fans and enthusiasts from North America, Italy, France, and the UK to submit an image and brief description of a weapon that they designed. Two weapon designs (one from the North American and one from the European entries) were chosen as winners and will appear in the game for those players who have a saved game present on their game console from the original Army of Two.


Army of Two: The 40th Day received mixed reviews from critics. Aggregating review websites GameRankings and Metacritic gave the Xbox 360 version 74.13% and 73/100[20][24] and the PlayStation 3 version 72.39% and 74/100.[21][23] The PlayStation Portable version received reviews with a score of 46.40% and 49/100 on GameRankings and Metacritic.[22][25] IGN awarded it an 8.5/10: "The morality moments could have posed larger dilemmas and the AI still stumbles at times, but overall, The 40th Day is a great game to blast through".[26] PSM3 Magazine UK awarded it 85%: "It's not the most progressive or technically impressive game on PS3, but the morality system, weapon customization and online co-op elevate it, and it's one of the best cover-to-cover shooters on PS3", while PlayStation: The Official Magazine (US) awarded it 9 out of 10, saying "EA Montreal delivers a rich, over-the-top buddy experience that provides intelligent choices and a tough but fun Die Hard-like vibe that helps lighten the game's dark, gritty atmosphere". While Hardcore Gamer Magazine criticized the game's minor improvements and similarity to the original, it noted that "The 40th Day is more serious, lacking in the "what the hell" moments that peppered the first game."[27]


Army of Two: The 40th Day is a third-person shooter video game that is developed by EA Montreal and published by Electronic Arts for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and PlayStation Portable. It is the sequel to Army of Two. Army of Two: The 40th Day shipped on January 12, 2010 in North America and January 8, 2010 in Europe.


Army of Two: The 40th Day focuses on two-player cooperative play and employs a cover system. It features Tyson Rios and Elliot Salem as combatant partners who, with the assistance of their handler Alice Murray, must fight to survive and prevail over invading forces that have engulfed Shanghai, China in a devastating man-made disaster. A demo of the game has been released on Xbox Live and PlayStation Network.


Army of Two: The 40th Day expands on and refines the cooperative play featured in the original game. Unlike in Army of Two, where cooperative moments were primarily predetermined at particular intervals in the game, in Army of Two: The 40th Day, players can use co-op moves at any time. For example, players can mock surrender or setup simultaneous sniper shots. This is in addition to using Aggro as a mechanic for tactically engaging enemies in the midst of combat.


In Army of Two: The 40th Day players are forced to make moral decisions that affect the story of the game. At pre-determined points in the game players will be presented with a choice, for example whether they should overtake a security guard and steal weapons or vacate the premises. The decision is not a vote between two players. but instead either player must decide while the other player is forced to accept the ramifications of that decisions regardless of what their preference was. The outcome and presentation of these morality moments takes the form of comic panels created by the popular artists Chris Bachalo and Jock.


EA Montreal has taken steps to ensure that the gameplay in Army of Two: The 40th Day is more dynamic than the original. This includes the environment, where some objects, such as wooden walls and crumbling mortar can now be penetrated by bullets. Likewise, there are now noncombatant NPCs that players will be forced to engage with. Players can simply ignore these civilian NPCs and allow them to be killed by combatants (or their own fire), or alternatively players can decide to deliberately rescue them. This sort of interaction can also occur in specific hostage scenarios where players must use coop moves to successfully overcome the situation. This is distinctly unlike the original Army of Two, where the enemies existed in the world solely to attack the player. There is also a lot more variety in characters, as there are more than twice as many different types of NPCs in Army of Two: The 40th Day, when compared to the original game.


Army of Two: The 40th Day maintains its focus on co-op play by requiring that players play in a partnership. Partners are a source for ammunition and are able to revive their fallen team mate. There are a total of four multiplayer game modes:


Rios and Salem bunker down to rest, and, realizing that there is no escape, decide to exact revenge on the man responsible for this nightmare; They decide to kill the leader of the 40th Day Initiative, Jonah Wade. They track him to a Chinese temple that is heavily fortified. If the player saved all of the civilian hostages, they will appear armed and ready to back up Rios and Salem. If the player did not save enough civilian hostages, then Rios and Salem must take on the enemies alone. The pair infiltrate the temple and eliminate wave after wave of mercenaries until they reach the inner sanctum. Rios and Salem blast their way through a large door, and finally come face to face with Jonah. Jonah delivers a monologue justifying his actions as a violent social experiment to force the world to turn back from the moral decay that is destroying it. Jonah is holding a device which he claims is the trigger for a nuclear bomb located in the heart of the city. 041b061a72


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